Accom Thailand

November 26, 2008

ถ้าฝรั่งประท้วง ก็เป็นเรื่องธรรมดาหรืออย่างไร – Thai protesters shut down airport it’s normal act

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Thai protesters shut down airport


By Thomas Fuller Wednesday, November 26, 2008


Anti-government protesters talk to a driver at the main road to Bangkok's Suvarnabhumi Airport. (Sukree Sukplang/Reuters)

Anti-government protesters talk to a driver at the main road to Bangkok's Suvarnabhumi Airport. (Sukree Sukplang/Reuters)

bangkok: Thailand’s main international airport remained shut Wednesday after protesters besieged the facility, startling tourists, halting flights and escalating months of simmering political tensions into a full-blown national crisis.

The airport raid, carried out Tuesday by men wielding metal rods who pushed past riot police officers, was the climax of three years of intermittent protests that have tarnished thailand’s long-standing image as a freewheeling but stable nation.

A series of extreme measures by protesters, including a violent clash with government supporters on Tuesday in Bangkok that left 11 people injured, has brought the government near collapse and left Thailand’s democracy teetering.

The government has struggled to carry on its business while trying to quell the most recent demonstrations, but has found itself consumed by the stalemate. A sit-in at government offices forced Prime Minister Somchai Wongsawat to conduct business elsewhere.

This week, protesters began what they called a final push against the country’s leaders. They prevented one important parliamentary session, and have said they plan to prevent any future sessions or Cabinet meetings, effectively paralyzing the government.

The protesters, a loose coalition of royalists, academics and members of the urban elite, say they are frustrated with years of vote-buying and corruption.

Many are also skeptical of Thai democracy in its current form and propose a voting system that would lessen the representation of lower-income Thais, whom they say are particularly susceptible to vote-buying.

The latest protests come amid anxiety over the health of the ailing 80-year-old King Bhumibol Adulyadej and worries about royal succession. There is also frustration about an underperforming national economy that has not been able to move beyond low-cost manufacturing.

The recent protests, like most of those over the past three years, have centered on Thaksin Shinawatra, the former prime minister, who was removed from power two years ago in a military coup.

Protesters accuse the current government, and the one before it, of being Thaksin’s proxies.


Thaksin was recently convicted in absentia of abuse of power and remains in exile. The current prime minister is Thaksin’s brother-in-law.


At the cavernous Suvarnabhumi airport early Wednesday, protesters said they would remain in the facility until the government stepped down.


During the face-off with riot police officers on Tuesday, one protester said she was willing to die if necessary. “If they shoot, let them shoot,” said Pranee Rattanatakerngporn, a 55-year-old protester who traveled to Bangkok from the northern city of Chiang Mai. “I will stay here until we win.”


Officials decided to close the airport around 9 p.m. Tuesday “for the safety of all passengers.”


“I’m very worried about the situation now,” said Sereerat Prasutanon, director of the airport. “I think it’s time that the army comes out and helps to take care of the situation.”

Several explosions were reported early Wednesday outside the airport, injuring at least three people, police said, according to the Associated Press.

By shutting down the airport, protesters are ultimately holding the country hostage, analysts say.

“The gateway to the country is now blocked,” said Panitan Wattanayagorn, a professor of political science at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok. “This is an acute problem for the government.”

Suvarnabhumi is the world’s 18th largest airport in terms of passenger traffic. It is the main conduit for tourists and businesspeople arriving in Thailand and is a major transit hub for Southeast Asia.


Among the passengers stranded at the airport was Anna Plahn, a 34-year-old from Sweden wrapping up a vacation with her two young children. “My two kids are sick and they want to go home,” she said.


“This is the worst thing that has ever happened to us.”


On Tuesday, thousands of protesters were camped out on the main entrance ramp to the airport, blocking traffic to the departure terminal. They spread razor wire on the road to limit traffic, which was allowed to trickle through. A truck parked in front of the terminal served as a makeshift stage where a well-known actor, Saranyu Wongkrachang, led the crowd of protesters in song throughout the night.

The protesters, who had mainly confined their demonstrations to their sit-in at the government compound, took to the streets Monday, when they forced the cancellation of parliament and temporarily cut electricity supply to the police headquarters.

On Tuesday, thousands of protesters kept the government on the run, blocking the entrance to its temporary offices north of the city and massing in front of army headquarters.

In the late afternoon a clash erupted between protesters and government supporters. Television showed two protesters shooting handguns in the direction of the government supporters and beating them with metal rods and sticks. There were no reports of deaths on Tuesday.

The video also showed protesters surrounding a motorcycle taxi driver and holding a knife to his throat as he clasped his hands together, begging for mercy. Thaksin has many supporters among taxi drivers. It was unclear what happened to the man.

With nearly daily protests taking place in Bangkok for the past six months, many Thais have grown frustrated.

The print news media, which has been generally critical of the government and supportive of the protests, has recently run articles skeptical of the daily street demonstrations.

One columnist in the Nation newspaper on Tuesday called the protests a “never-ending saga that is futile and a drain on society.”

But the People’s Alliance for Democracy, the group leading the movement to unseat the government, still has a loyal following. The latest spate of protests began in April, but became more serious in August, when the alliance took over the prime minister’s office compound, forcing the previous prime minister to operate out of the VIP terminal of Don Muang Airport, the capital’s older airfield, which is now used exclusively for domestic flights.

On Monday, protesters blocked access to the offices at Don Muang.

“You don’t have to doubt what we will do next,” Somsak Kosaisuk, a protest leader, said Tuesday from a temporary stage set up at Don Muang airport. “First, we will not let the Cabinet use this place for their meetings anymore. Second, wherever they go for their meetings, we have our special troops that will follow them.”

A Cabinet meeting had been planned for Wednesday, but government officials said it might be pushed back.

The prime minister was scheduled to return late Wednesday from a trip to Peru, where he attended a summit meeting of Asian and Pacific leaders.

As the Thai economy slows down as the global financial crisis causes ripples here, and as the stalemate between the government and the protesters deepens, many Thais are hoping for a resolution.

“How is it going to end?” said Bharavee Boonsongsap, a 34-year-old producer for MTV Thailand. “I keep asking people but they have no answer.”

“Thais are fighting Thais,” Bharavee said. “People have become aggressive, and even children have been taught to hate the opposite side.”

Janesara Fugal contributed reporting.

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Published: November 26, 2008 Thai protesters shut down airport
http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/11/26/asia/27THAI.php


Printer-Friendly Thai protesters shut down airport



Airport strike is normal in England why not in Thailand


11 months ago: Crowds of passengers are pictured in the Check In area of the South terminal at Gatwick Airport, in Sussex, in southern England, 10 August 2006. Workers at seven British airports including London’s Heathrow voted Friday 21 December 2007, to stage a series of strikes in January 2008 over pensions in a move which could cause severe disruption. The staff including firefighters will stage 24-hour stoppages on January 7 and January 14 and will strike for 48 hours from January 17.

airportstike_london


Airport strike is normal in France why not in Thailand


11 months ago: Travellers wait at Orly Airport as a strike by Air France ground crew over pay issues grounded passengers for the third day, near Paris December 22, 2007.

11 months ago- Travellers wait at Orly Airport

11 months ago- Travellers wait at Orly Airport

11 months ago: Passengers wait for informations in Terminal 2 at Orly airport, outside Paris, 21 December 2007 as some 44 percent of Air France flights were cancelled due to a strike by AF ground staff upon calll of two unions CGT and Sud Aerien. Dozens of flights were delayed and others cancelled, which brought serious inconvenience for Xmas holiday makers.

Passengers wait for informations in Terminal 2 at Orly airport, outside Paris, 21 December 2007

Passengers wait for informations in Terminal 2 at Orly airport, outside Paris, 21 December 2007

11 months ago: People line up at check-in counters at Orly Airport as a strike by Air France ground crew over pay issues grounded passengers for the third day, near Paris December 22, 2007

Orly Airport as a strike by Air France ground crew over pay issues grounded passengers for the third day

Orly Airport as a strike by Air France ground crew over pay issues grounded passengers for the third day


Airport strike is normal in Italy why not in Thailand

1 week ago: Alitalia jets are seen in the background at Milan’s Linate airport, Italy, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2008. Alitalia canceled dozens of flights for a third straight day Wednesday because of labor unrest leaving customers in Italy scrambling for alternative flights or facing long delays. The ailing airline predicted some 50 flights would be canceled as it continued to feel the effect of a wildcat strike on Monday and a work-to-rule protest by pilots over the last few days.

Alitalia jets are seen in the background at Milan's Linate airport, Italy, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2008.

1 week ago: Alitalia jets are seen in the background at Milan's Linate airport, Italy, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2008.

2 months ago: Alitalia’s air hostesses and employees demonstrate during a strike at Fiumicino airport near Rome on September 17, 2008. Alitalia cancelled 40 flights — half of them international — because of a four-hour strike by a minority union opposed to a rescue deal and Italy’s government summoned all nine unions from Alitalia, as the labour minister said negotiations on a deal to save the flag carrier had reached an end.

Alitalia's air hostesses and employees demonstrate during a strike at Fiumicino airport near Rome on September 17, 2008

2 months ago: Alitalia's air hostesses and employees demonstrate during a strike at Fiumicino airport near Rome on September 17, 2008

2 months ago: Alitalia’s employees demonstrate during a strike at Fiumicino airport near Rome on September 17, 2008. Alitalia cancelled 40 flights — half of them international — because of a four-hour strike by a minority union opposed to a rescue deal and Italy’s government summoned all nine unions from Alitalia, as the labour minister said negotiations on a deal to save the flag carrier had reached an end.

September 17, 2008. Alitalia cancelled 40 flights -- half of them international

September 17, 2008. Alitalia cancelled 40 flights -- half of them international

7 months ago: Employees of Atitech, a company responsible for the maintenance of Alitalia planes, demonstrate against planned layoffs in the Air France-KLM proposal to takeover the ailing Italian airline, at Naples’ Capodichino airport, southern Italy, Wednesday, April 2, 2008. Alitalia’s strike-prone unions were meeting Wednesday with the Air France-KLM chairman who is seeking their agreement to keep alive a deal to buy the struggling national carrier.

Air France-KLM proposal to takeover the ailing Italian airline, at Naples' Capodichino airport, southern Italy, Wednesday, April 2, 2008.

Air France-KLM proposal to takeover the ailing Italian airline, at Naples' Capodichino airport, southern Italy, Wednesday, April 2, 2008.

ปรับปรุงจาก ข่าว และ ภาพ ของ http://www.daylife.com
airport strike england
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พิมพ์ ข่าวนี้ airport strike england


พิมพ์ ข่าวนี้ airport strike france


พิมพ์ ข่าวนี้ airport strike italy

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1 Comment »

  1. เที่ยวพัทยา จองโรงแรมที่พักในพัทยา

    Comment by danai — June 23, 2009 @ 06:15 | Reply


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